Artists

Stephen Scott Young

Stephen Scott Young’s spring exhibition at Adelson Galleries in New York City demonstrated a quiet mastery of technique. Young works primarily in silverpoint and drybrush watercolor, and achieves some remarkably refined effects, especially in his portraits of children. One of his favorite models is Cindy, a five-year-old from Gregory...

Maureen Mullarkey

Maureen Mullarkey’s recent show at Kouros Gallery in New York City was built on a paradox: the enduring power of the physical book in an era of disembodied information. Two other artists reviewed a while ago in these pages, Ephraim Rubenstein and Paul Béliveau, are painters who take books as their principal subject matter—not richly...

Jacob Collins

In May, John Pence Gallery in San Francisco presented recent work by Jacob Collins, a major figure in the contemporary realism revival and founder of three influential teaching institutions: the Water Street Atelier, the Grand Central Academy of Art and the Hudson River School for Landscape. As an artist, Collins functions at a very...

Richard Mayhew

For over half a century, Richard Mayhew has been painting vibrantly colored landscapes that gracefully negotiate the border region between representation and abstraction. This summer, Zone: Contemporary Art in New York City presented “Monuments,” a solo exhibition of highlights from his career. In the fall,...

Javier Marín

The seven beautifully expressive, bearded bronze heads in this exhibition at Nohra Haime Gallery (May 20–June 20, 2009), by the Mexican artist Javier Marín, each stand almost five feet tall, flowing beards included. They are mounted on narrow steel pillars with circular bases, and above these severe geometries their beards proliferate...

Ephraim Rubenstein

In an age when traditionally bound books are apparently being replaced by implements of the digital age, when textuality is supplanted by disposable “info,” this exhibition, at George Billis in New York City, evoked our ambiguous relationship to the book as artifact, as still life. These recent paintings of book piles are not trompe l...

Robert Taplin

In his recent exhibition, “Everything Imagined Is Real,” at Winston Wachter Fine Art in New York City, Robert Taplin presented a series of nine sculpted contemporary scenes (all 2008) based on Dante’s Inferno. In the first, I. Thus My Soul Which Was Still in Flight (The Dark Wood), a groggy, naked man climbs out of a bed in which a...

Bessie Potter Vonnoh

One of the most successful women artists of her generation, Bessie Potter Vonnoh (1872–1955) specialized in accomplished images of women and children. At a time when the field of American sculpture was dominated by men creating large, public monuments, she designed intimate works for domestic interiors and gardens,...

David Kassan

A prolific contemporary realist, Brooklyn-based David Kassan combines abstract backgrounds with portraiture and figurative skill in experimental arrangements. His recent exhibition at Gallery Henoch, “Introspections,” comprised of drawings and trompe l’oeil “texture studies” in oil, as well as large figurative paintings, demonstrated...

John Moore

The four industrial landscapes in John Moore’s recent show “Thirteen Miles from Paradise,” at Hirschl & Adler Modern in New York City, carry a good deal of art historical resonance. Moore finds beauty in steel mills and utilitarian bridges, in the tradition of Precisionists such as Charles Demuth and Charles Sheeler. Those artists...

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