Artists

William Nicols

The first thing you notice about William Nichols’s (b. 1942) oil-on-linen landscapes, which were on view this spring at O.K. Harris in New York City, was the way they combine physical scale with unexpected intimacy. Twin Logs Crossing (2005) is 63-by-83 inches, but it doesn’t have the epic sweep of the traditional American vista as...

Janice Anthony

The haunting acrylic-on-linen landscapes of Maine artist Janice Anthony (b. 1946) were on view this spring in a solo show at Sherry French Gallery in New York City. The title of the exhibition, “Reflections,” could be taken metaphorically to describe the artist’s mediations on unpeopled woods and shorelines, but these carefully...

Dean Larson and John Patrick Campbell

In May John Pence Gallery in San Francisco presented recent oil paintings by two talented realists who work in a variety of genres. Dean Larson (b. 1957), a recipient of the prestigious John and Anna Lee Stacey National Competition, paints with a vibrant palette. His landscapes and cityscapes, sumptuous Spanish Baroque-style still...

Robert J. Brawley

Robert J. Brawley paints haunting images in which symbolic density coexists with fluid representationalism. In Early Netherlandish Painting Erwin Panofsky wrote of the “disguised symbolism” of the Flemish Primitives: “The more the painters rejoiced in the discovery and reproduction of the visible world, the more intensely did they...

Javier Marín

For anyone interested in figurative sculpture, the year began with a notable event, as J. Johnson Gallery in Jacksonville Beach, Florida, presented twenty-one monumental and life-size bronze and terracotta works by the extraordinary Mexican artist Javier Marín. The works, weighing over 200 tons, were flown in from Mexico City. Over...

Agustin Torres Calderón

Mexican painter Agustin Torres Calderón (b. 1948) has had over seventy exhibitions, but his show this June at the Jadite Galleries in New York City marks his United States debut. Although the self-taught artist has been painting since childhood, it was not until 1994, when he sold the family business, that he has been able to devote...

James Lancel McElhinney and Douglas Wirls

The Painting Center in New York City featured two landscape retrospectives in March 2005, juxtaposing artists with very different styles and aims. James Lancel McElhinney paints historical American battlefield sites as they exist today. Since 1991 he has drawn most of his subject matter from American Civil War sites. He travels to...

John Frame

“Enigma Variations: The Sculpture of John Frame, 1980–2005,” this Spring at the Long Beach Museum of Art, looked back at the career of an idiosyncratic California artist whose haunting sculptural installations combine crafted wood and found objects. Frame (b. 1950) has a background in theater, dance and literature. His small-scale...

Nancy Lawton

“Drawings in Sterling Silver,” at Hirsch & Adler Modern in New York City, showcased Nancy Lawton’s virtuosity with a medium more widely used during the Renaissance than today. Both Leonardo da Vinci and Albrecht Dürer (in a famous Self-Portrait executed at age thirteen) made exquisite drawings in silverpoint, a technique that...

Martha Mayer Erlebacher

Flora (2004), an allegorical portrait of a beautiful young woman with folded arms, was the centerpiece of a small retrospective of paintings by Martha Mayer Erlebacher at the Seraphin Gallery in Philadelphia (Feb. 25−April 4, 2005). In one hand, Flora holds a white vase-like calla lily, in the other, a sheaf of long, green,...

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