Artists

William Nicholson

The British painter William Nicholson (1872–1949) is largely unknown in the United States, although there was a 1926 gallery show. In the spring Paul Kasmin Gallery in New York City rectified this oversight with an exhibition of paintings that look remarkably fresh. Nicholson’s style is modern in the manner of a nineteenth-century...

Kate Lehman and Sarah Lamb

Jacob Collins’s Water Street Atelier has become a magnet for talented artists eager to explore the realist tradition. In March Spanierman Gallery in New York City presented recent paintings by two of Collins’s students, Kate Lehman (b. 1968) and Sarah Lamb (b. 1971), who are doing remarkable work in a variety of genres—still life,...

Glen Hansen

Glen Hansen (b.1961) paints picturesque views of some of the world’s great cities—Paris, Venice, New York—but avoids the straight-on perspective of the traditional tourist vedutte in favor of quirky compositions. His spring exhibition at the Fischbach Gallery in New York City, entitled “Praha,” recorded his exploration of the Czech...

American Illustration

The late nineteenth century witnessed a flowering in the art of illustration, due in large part to advances in printing technology. Reproductions suddenly became near-copies of the originals, and talented painters achieved wealth and celebrity exploring the new media. Before the 1880s illustrations were a familiar element of American...

Bernardo Torrens

Contemporary Spanish painters are doing some of the most interesting work of the current realist revival. In October Bernarducci Meisel Gallery in New York City showcased recent paintings by Bernardo Torrens (b. 1957), a native of Madrid who taught himself to draw and paint while studying medicine. His mastery of anatomy and humane...

David Bierk

The traveling exhibition “David Bierk: History” commemorates an artist (1944–2002) known for his interpretations of paintings from the past. Although he is sometimes described as a postmodernist, Bierk avoids the traps of smug revisionism. No tinge of irony corrodes his reverence for the old masters and the giants of the nineteenth...

Realism Invitational

This fall Klaudia Marr Gallery in Santa Fe presented its 12th Annual Realism Invitational, showcasing thirty-five contemporary artists. As usual, the exhibition cast a wide net. Some artists use the figurative idiom to chronicle pop culture or comment on the state of society, as Kenny Mencher does in his 2004 oil Dog, depicting an...

Steven Assael


In Fall 2005, Ann Nathan Gallery in Chicago presented "Steven Assael: Painting and Drawings", an exhibition of recent works by this contemporary realist master. Assael (b. 1957), who graduated from Pratt Institute and has taught both there and at the School of Visual Arts, has an academic mastery of the nude, seen here in some...

Alan Feltus

http://nccsc.net/asset/original_filename/631/FELTUSLARGE.jpg">Alan Feltus’s contemporary classicism is rooted in his love of the Italian Renaissance, but his paintings are tinged with a melancholy that seems both modern and timeless. Born in Washington, D.C., in 1943, he has lived in Italy since 1987. His subjects are figures—most...

Neil Welliver

During the second half of the twentieth century—when American art was dominated by a series of movements from Abstract Expressionism to Conceptualism—Neil Welliver (1929–2005) was working in the idiom of landscape, perpetuating a genre that reaches back to the first great indigenous movement in the United States, the Hudson River...

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