Artists

Maureen Mullarkey

In our current infatuation with electronic publishing and virtual imagery—a step beyond what Walter Benjamin called the age of mechanical reproduction—we sometimes forget what a precious and pleasurable thing the physical art object can be. Recently, George Billis Gallery in New York City featured a show of collages by Maureen...

Lani Irwin and Alan Feltus

This summer the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art in Colorado will be presenting simultaneous solo exhibitions of paintings by Lani Irwin and Alan Feltus, American artists based in Assisi, Italy. The title of Irwin’s show, “The Illusionist,” could be a reference to the mimetic magic of the accomplished representational artist, but it...

Hudson River School


“Different Views in Hudson River School Painting,” an exhibition at the Babcock Galleries in New York City, organized by the Westmoreland Museum of American Art, has an interesting premise. Curator Judith Hansen O’Toole, director of the Westmoreland Museum, focuses on pairs, series and groupings of paintings as a way of...

Domenico Tiepolo

Domenico Tiepolo (1727–1804) is best known for his charming images of commedia dell’arte characters and the secular life of Venice. Yet he was also a deeply pious man who created a cycle of 313 large religious drawings, in ink and wash on handmade paper, an ambitious project executed in a relatively short period, between 1786 and 1790...

Gustave Courbet

“Courbet and the Modern Landscape,” which ended recently a year-long tour at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, is a tight show with a solid thesis. We tend to think of great nineteenth-century landscapists as Romantic or Impressionist, but these thirty-seven paintings—executed between 1855 and 1877 by the quintessential French...

Stephen Magsig

Stephen Magsig’s new urban streetscapes, which were on view through the end of 2006 at David Klein Gallery in Birmingham, Michigan, draw on a number of stylistic traditions, but they have their own poetic logic. Tight shots of commercial buildings dominate, usually in New York or Detroit, although Palace Detail, L.A. (2006) takes on a...

Meredith Bergmann

Figurative public sculpture, a mainstay for millennia, seems to be re-emerging as a viable artform after a half-century of modernist abstraction in civic spaces. But the world has changed since the golden age of Daniel Chester French, Augustus Saint-Gaudens and the American Renaissance; the old paradigms cannot be unquestioningly...

David Ligare

David Ligare’s autumn exhibition at Koplin Del Rio Gallery in California, his eighth solo show there, was titled “Ritual Offerings,” alluding to the cults of ancient Greece and Rome. Ligare (b. 1945) does not traffic, however, in the fancy-dress reenactments of propiation and celebration rites that were a specialty of historicists...

Forum Gallery

“New Faces,” a group show of four young representational painters, was a late summer offering at Forum Gallery in New York City. The show had a distinctly international flavor, and the artists were very different stylistically. All seemed engaged in the social, political and psychological undercurrents of today’s society, in contrast...

Stephen Tanis

The exhibition of paintings by Stephen Tanis (b. 1945), at Sherry French Gallery in New York City, is entitled “Close at Hand,” reflecting the sometimes startling immediacy of these recent still lifes and figure studies. That immediacy comes across as psychological in figure groups such as Srebrenica (2003)—a reaction to the Bosnian...

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