Artists

Pierre Bonnard

“Pierre Bonnard: The Late Interiors,” recently on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, demonstrated that, contrary to much critical thinking, modernism is not incompatible with natural, easily accessible beauty. Bonnard’s (1867–1947) luminous paintings give the viewer a jolt of pure...

Koo Schadler

Koo Schadler’s December exhibition at J. Cacciola Gallery in New York City, titled “Illuminated,” revealed a deep appreciation for Italian and Northern early Renaissance art. She achieves jewel-like effects using the traditional medium of egg tempera and mimics historical formats, such as the...

Andrew Jones

Andrew Jones, whose work was on view at George Billis Gallery in New York City in January, is an architectural naturalist. His paintings constitute a kind of field guide to the mostly nineteenth-century ornamental ironwork of urban stoops, which—while usually ignored by tourists focused on iconic structures—adds immeasurably to the...

Shelia Hicks

Most of Homer’s many references to weaving have to do with working at the loom as one of women’s prescribed activities. That is what Hector had in mind when he ordered Andromache back to her loom and away from the concerns of men. Though there have been enough male weavers over the centuries to dispel the notion of weaving as a...

Laura Karetzky

Narrative painting, that mainstay of the Victorians, emulated the novel, just as the grander genre of history painting aspired to epic poetry. Narrative was one of the things modernism claimed to have jettisoned. Yet it kept cropping up throughout the twentieth century, in, for example, Jacob Lawrence’s social-history sequences and...

Albrecht Dürer

Albrecht Dürer (1471–1528) was a virtuoso graphic artist whose woodcuts and engravings raise him to the first rank of Renaissance artists. Seizing the opportunity provided by Gutenberg’s invention of the printing press in 1450, he embarked on an ambitious scheme to document the wonders of nature and to illustrate Europe’s dominant...

Frederic Edwin Church, William Bradford, George Chambers

The unearthly beauty of Earth’s polar regions has long stirred the imaginations of explorers, writers and artists. Mary Shelley ended her 1818 novel Frankenstein with the doctor’s pursuit of the creature across Arctic wastes, and Edgar Allan Poe included Antarctica in his Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym (1838). Competitive exploration—...

Atlanta’s Millennium Gate

At the start of the twenty-first century, Atlanta is the fastest growing metropolitan area in the United States, with a population exceeding five million. Its skyline is punctuated with elegant new skyscrapers designed by leading urban architects, and the city is home to more Fortune 500 companies than any other, except New York. It...

Luciano Ventrone

In May, Bernarducci Meisel Gallery presented the first New York City solo exhibition of paintings by Italian Photorealist Luciano Ventrone. The mimetic clarity of his work is uncanny. In fact, the illusion of three-dimensionality he achieves in his still lifes and nudes far exceeds the flattened verisimilitude of the camera eye,...

Tula Telfair

There was food for thought as well as much to seduce the eye in “Located at the Edge of a Momentary Convergence: New Landscape Paintings,” a late spring exhibition of fifteen works by Tula Telfair at Forum Gallery in Los Angeles. Her epic-scale vistas, untouched by signs of human presence, clearly allude to the sublime aspect of the...

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